Feature

Small brains, big decisions

Life is full of binary choices, even for small animals like fruit flies. With new technologies, scientists can now dissect the mechanisms of decision making in the simplest of brains, at the levels of individual molecules, cells, and networks.

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The future of TB is TBD

Deadly and elusive, M. tuberculosis has ravaged the world for centuries. Armed with new technologies to study the pathogen, scientists may finally be poised to intervene.

FOREFRONT

FOREFRONT

Insights and ideas from Rockefeller labs

Scientists have drawn a map of the human placenta, found new clues to understanding autism, and studied geckos with an eye toward robotics. Find out what else they’ve been up to.

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Features

Interview

Embryos, ethics, and responsibility

With science constantly advancing, ethical boundaries need regular recalibration. It’s a task scientists cannot do alone, says developmental biologist Ali H. Brivanlou; all of society needs to engage.

With science constantly advancing, ethical boundaries need regular recalibration. It’s a task scientists cannot do alone, says developmental biologist Ali H. Brivanlou; all of society needs to engage.

Becoming A Scientist

Priya Rajasethupathy

Memories are inherently shifty. A neuroscientist with a new lab of her own, Rajasethupathy likens the brain’s memory function to Wikipedia—always evolving, occasionally unreliable.

Memories are inherently shifty. A neuroscientist with a new lab of her own, Rajasethupathy likens the brain’s memory function to Wikipedia—always evolving, occasionally unreliable.

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Seeing is believing

Scientists are blowing things up like never before. Here are five bio-imaging techniques ready to reveal biology’s smallest secrets.

Scientists are blowing things up like never before. Here are five bio-imaging techniques ready to reveal biology’s smallest secrets.