Interview

There’s a reason for those gut feelings

Bacteria don’t laugh, cry, or get angry. They have no emotions of their own. Yet Daniel Mucida suspects they have considerable influence in the human body, including sway over our thoughts and feelings.

Feature

How to ruin her radar

Mosquitoes that can’t find us are mosquitoes that can’t infect us. Scientists are scouring the genome of Aedes aegypti to understand the essence of her blood-seeking behavior, and create repellents that actually work.

FOREFRONT

FOREFRONT

Insights and ideas from Rockefeller labs

How might scientists get better at making vaccines? Will they one day be able to create living cells from scratch? And how did the turtle ant get its weirdly shaped head?

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Features

Interview

Mary Jeanne Kreek

Thousands of years after humans discovered opioids, we’re just beginning to understand how these substances warp the brain and change behaviors.

Thousands of years after humans discovered opioids, we’re just beginning to understand how these substances warp the brain and change behaviors.

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Terrestrial treasures

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

Therapeutics has gone underground. From one bag of soil, chemists can now procure millions of microbial molecules. Any one could be tomorrow’s lifesaving medicine.

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Why rare diseases are everyone’s problem

More than 7,000 medical conditions are considered rare. Many might be low-hanging fruit for scientific discovery, ready to help advance all of medicine.

More than 7,000 medical conditions are considered rare. Many might be low-hanging fruit for scientific discovery, ready to help advance all of medicine.